Tag Archives: #proplant

Heat wave, humid, rain birings on pythium- January 2017

Happy new year everyone I hope you had some time to enjoy with family and friends.

What a start to the year heat waves in Victoria, WA, SA NSW. Storms in QLD and everything in between.

 

Non disease Issues you may face

I have been seeing quite a few sick started to see a few sick turf surfaces around the place just due to sheer pressure from the heat, lack of rain and too much rain. One thing to keep in mind when there has not been alot of rain like especially here in Sydney is to look sodium levels. i have seen this season and in the past poa really going off colour and t

Generally speaking this may not be an issue every year or your water source might be quite low in sodium generally speaking. However this does change over time and has to be monitored. As well having low levels is good but bare in mind putting on a little all the time will build up in the soil and the plant and cause the plant to suffer. Keep this in mind this season, look at an few applications of a product that will reduce sodium levels. Talk to your local rep on this as this issue can be the underlying cause of disease especially pythium..

Another issue you may see is nematodes. Again you may not have a history or testing for them numbers have come back low. However I remember a talk I heard on nematodes from David Westall he always said that the numbers don’t tell the whole story and your threshold may be different to the person down the road.

If your turf is stressed and the root system has shrunken you are more prone to an attack as the plant can’t fight them off naturally.so keep an eye out.

With these conditions you need to look at for the remainder of the summer is your spray program.Normally 3 week intervals are working but with this much pressure you need to look at shortening intervals to 2 weeks. On top of that a in between spray may be needed just to top things with the onset of heavy rains.

The week ahead

Pythium

Pythium is one disease that will be present now.

Water logged greens are a perfect environment for Pythium root rot. You can see Pythium as patterns in greens that follow the drainage lines. Equipment use also spreads the disease. If you have a short root system with compacted soil and poor drainage, your turf will need extra light watering to keep it alive. This will increase Pythium pressure, due to plant wetness. On the other hand, deep infrequent watering can increase Pythium pressure as well as the roots and the soil are being completely soaked which is conducive to Pythium outbreaks. Very hard to win in this situation. That is why it is important to maintain healthy turf and to use specific Pythium fungicides on a preventative basis.

Apply your fungicide (use Proplant here) down past the leaf and crown do not leave on the surface with application (water in slightly after your boom application)

Proplant image

As always we do recommend a broad spectrum tank mix partner with Proplant (as its is specific to pythium only) as when we were anyalysing the samples in the trials we always found other diseases namely brown patch. So have a look at partnering Proplant with Ippon, 250GT, Protak, Monstar,

Also be aware of algae with all the wet surfaces. A good mix is Dacogreen + Liquid Dek here.

Cultural Controls of Pythium:

  • Avoid too much N
  • Aerate the area slightly to allow more oxygen to penetrate the soil
  • Utilise pentrant wetting agents to push the moisture through the profile-I don’t tend to recommend to use with Proplant as it may push past the plant where you need to target the spray
  • Keep plants healthy as possible with using root stimulants and other biological products
  • Avoid mowing in moist hot weather
  • Raise mowing heights
  • Avoid verti cutting, top dressing if greens are infected  as it puts more stress on the plant
  • Reduce leaf wetness
  • Increase air flow and sunlight to Pythium prone areas
  • Reduce sodium levels
  • Monitor for insects

For more information see the brochure here Proplant Brochure Also have a look at our guide to managing pythium not just from a chemical point of view but from a cultural view. Disease guide rhizo eri pythium 2014

I hope this post helps understand the disease a little better and how to manage it.

Also I am heading to to the USA to GIS again and will be attending a few lectures that i will post about later on. You will be able to follow what is going on through my twitter feed.

As usual if you need any help feel free to contact me

zreikat@campbellchemicals.com.au

Dacogreen WeatherShield “The Ultimate Chlorothalonil”

Some facts you may not be aware of in regards to chlorhthalonil in Australi:

In 1971 (some readers would remember this) Colin Campbell Chemicals introduced chlorothalonil named Daconil into the Australian turf market giving us over 45 years experience. From the initial formulation as a wettable powder, then into a SC (suspension concentrate) and now to the brand new WeatherShield formulation we have always continued research and development into chlorothalonil giving us insight into the working and benefits of this broad spectrum fungicide.

Dacogreen WeatherShield is an evolution of the original Dacogreen/Daconil (chlorothalonil) formulation that been the basis of broad spectrum disease control in the turf industry.

“WeatherShield Technology™”
Dacogreen WeatherShield is a superior surfactant technology.  This technology allows for:

● Improved sticking capability

● Smaller particle size (reduced from 3.5 to 2.5 micron) that spreads evenly for turf protection

● Improved rainfastness over the original Dacogreen 720

● Superior rainfastness over generic chlorothalonil formulations

Two trials were conducted on cucumbers to observe coverage and rainfastness of the following chlorothalanil based products:

  • Dacogreen 720 SC (original formulation)

  • Dacogreen 720 WeatherShield

  • Generic 1 chlorothalonil and

  • Generic 2 chlorothalonil

Cucumber leaves were chosen for the trial as product retention results could be measured more easily than turf leaves. Three replicates were performed for each product

Trial 1 measured the retention of chlorothalonil after simulated rainfall of 40mm of rain over a 2 hour period 1 hour after application. Note, that with this trial the leaves of the plants were not totally dry before rainfall occurred due to slow drying conditions.

Trial 2 measured the retention of chlorothalonil after simulated rainfall of 40mm of rain over a 2 hour period 24 hours after application.  In this instance the leaf of the plant was totally dry before rainfall occurred.

 


 

 

In both trials Dacogreen WeatherShield and Dacogreen original out performed Generic 1 and Generic 2 chlorothaolnil formulations easily for retention of product with more than double the retention. What this means is that using Dacogreen WeatherShield enables you to be confident that Dacogreen WeatherShield will still give you the results desired even with the onset of rain soon after application.

So next time choosing a chlorothalonil product for a broad spectrum disease control have a think about what you are getting and ask for DACOGREEN by Name

Dacogreen WeatherShield is registerd for use in Australia at the following rates

for:

Dollar spot,

13L-20L per hectare

Brown patch (rhizoctonia) 

13L-20L per hectare

Grey leaf spot control. 

24L per hectare

Always read the label before using any product.

Dacogreen is a registered trademark of Colin Campbell (Chemicals) Pty Ltd

For label and SDS see here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Extreme Disease pressure January 2016 -NSW

What a start to the year for NSW. After a a great greenkeepers Christmas January has turned to the extreme with high temps humidity and rainfall.

I started to see a few sick turf surfaces around the place just due to sheer pressure.

With these conditions you need to look at for the remainder of the summer is your spray program.Normally 3 week intervals are working but with this much pressure you need to look at shortening intervals to 2 weeks. On top of that a in between spray may be needed just to top things with the onset of heavy rains.

The week ahead

IMG_2388 IMG_2387

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pythium is one disease that will be present now.

Water logged greens are a perfect environment for Pythium root rot. You can see Pythium as patterns in greens that follow the drainage lines. Equipment use also spreads the disease. If you have a short root system with compacted soil and poor drainage, your turf will need extra light watering to keep it alive. This will increase Pythium pressure, due to plant wetness. On the other hand, deep infrequent watering can increase Pythium pressure as well as the roots and the soil are being completely soaked which is conducive to Pythium outbreaks. Very hard to win in this situation. That is why it is important to maintain healthy turf and to use specific Pythium fungicides on a preventative basis.

Apply your fungicide (use Proplant here) down past the crown do not leave on the surface with application (water in slightly after your boom application)

Proplant image

As always we do recommend a broad spectrum tank mix partner with Proplant (as its is specific to pythium only) as when we were anyalysing the samples in the trials we always found other diseases namely brown patch. So have a look at partnering Proplant with Ippon, 250GT, Protak, Monstar,

Also be aware of algae with all the wet surfaces. A good mix is Dacogreen + Liquid Dek here.

Cultural Controls of Pythium:

  • Avoid too much N
  • Aerate the area slightly to allow more oxygen to penetrate the soil
  • Utilise pentrant wetting agents to push the moisture through the profile
  • Keep plants healthy as possible with using root stimulants and other biological products
  • Avoid mowing in moist hot weather
  • Raise mowing heights
  • Avoid verti cutting, top dressing if greens are infected  as it puts more stress on the plant
  • Reduce leaf wetness
  • Increase air flow and sunlight to Pythium prone areas

For more information see the brochure here Proplant Brochure Also have a look at our guide to managing pythium not just from a chemical point of view but from a cultural view. Disease guide rhizo eri pythium 2014

I hope this post helps understand the disease a little better and how to manage it.

Also I am heading to to the USA to GIS again and will be attending a few lectures that i will post about later on. You will be able to follow what is going on through the live blog I’ll be doing with Turf Republic again and along with my twitter feed. I will post all the link the week before.

 

As usual if you need any help feel free to contact me

zreikat@campbellchemicals.com.au

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GF Weekend 2015

I usually write this post saying disease pressure is going through the roof but looking at the forecast for east coast Australia we are going to be getting some really hot temps and this does not go well with long weekends.Don’t get me wrong disease pressure is increasing as turf will be more vulnerable to attacks in this hot weather namely anthracnose and brown patch.

Photo 30-09-2015 9 02 39 pm Photo 30-09-2015 9 02 32 pm Photo 30-09-2015 8 45 14 pm Photo 30-09-2015 8 45 08 pm Photo 30-09-2015 9 02 46 pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some tips to help you get through the hot weekend

  • •Use turning boards for mowers, reduce victory lap cuts
  • Maintain adequate soil moisture throughout stressful times.
  • •Keep a balanced soil profile (get a soil test do not guess)
  • •Improve air flow – cut down trees/branches
  • •Communication with the club management and members
  • •Promote a healthy growing environment
  • •Nutrition (Don’t be afraid to apply N – just know how much and what source)
  • •Removing dew (use DewCure here or dew brooms) to reduce leaf diseases
  • •Roll greens instead of mowing – alternate each day
  • •Raise mowing heights (even by a 0.5 mm makes a difference)
  • Utilise bio stimulant products during the growing season such as kelp (proven to increase root mass), amino acid (heat stress), humic/fulvic acid products. For any bio stimulant look at what’s inside it and see how each component helps the plant- ask questions to those selling them.
  • Hand water with wetting agent tablets especially for drier areas

Also if you haven’t been notified Monstar permit has been extended while the registration is being evaluated. You can download the permit here

Monstar 2015 permit PER14379

STA GOLF DAY

As well if you are interested in coming along to the STA golf day at Bayview gold club in Sydney all information can be downloaded here.

Overall have a good weekend everyone and enjoy the time off where you can..

Good luck to Graeme and the crew for the NRL GF and Tony and his crew for the AFL.

Cheers

Nadeem

 

 

CCC, K&B Seminar featuring Percy Wong & Gary Demspey August 2015

Last month I was honored to be part of a educational seminar put on by K&B Adams (our Victorian Distributor) and ourselves featuring Dr Percy Wong from the University of Sydney and Gary Dempsey Superintendent NSW Golf Club. Percy and Gary have been in the industry a very long time and their experience really showed as they answered plenty of questions along the way.

Dr Wong spoke on new turf diseases that he has been researching and the impact that this will have in the long term to the industry without adequate funding. We hope here at Campbell’s this has increased awareness to the delegates in what needs to be done as an industry to deal with these diseases..

Gary Demspey spoke about the Aqua Aid Wetting Agents and the new technologies available to turf managers as well as the sunscreen product Turfscreen. For more information see Aqua Aid website.

I was last up and spoke on fairy ring management and updated delegates that Monstar has been submitted to the APVMA for fairy ring and brown patch (rhizoctonia) control.

iphone 180 iphone 186 iphone 177

 

 

Feedback from the day was very encouraging with many delegates learning more than what they expected to. thank you to the AGCSA and Turfmate for attending and writing about the day on their websites.

All delegates received information in their show bags as well as bonus material which has been emailed out as well.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A big thanks goes to the VGA who helped bring Percy down for their seminar the day before which we were happy to be a part of as well; Thanks to Gary for making the trip down and K&B Adams for getting the the number of turf managers that we had.Lastly thank you to all that did turn up we hope to bring you more education days like this in the future.

 

 

 

Disease Alert Pythium spp update Sydney Dec 2014

As continued from my last post we are experiencing very high pythium levels with all those storms around. It seems if you didn’t get the first 3 the next 3 hit your area. We tend to see Pythium blight and Pythium root rot. Both are very destructive and come in quickly like all Pythium diseases. Controlling Pythium is paramount and all measures should be taken. With these prolonged wet conditions Pythium root rot is most prevalent and is difficult to manage. There is not a lot of information on this type of disease but to say that with water soaked roots and water logged soils this disease runs rampant.

Pythium is always living in the soil and needs the right conditions to cause problems. Water logged greens are a perfect environment for Pythium root rot. You can see Pythium as patterns in greens that follow the drainage lines. Equipment use also spreads the disease. If you have a short root system with compacted soil and poor drainage, your turf will need extra light watering to keep it alive. This will increase Pythium pressure, due to plant wetness. On the other hand, deep infrequent watering can increase Pythium pressure as well as the roots and the soil are being completely soaked which is conducive to Pythium outbreaks. Very hard to win in this situation. That is why it is important to maintain healthy turf and to use specific Pythium fungicides on a preventative basis.

The aim now is to use fungicides on a 7-14 day intervals (no matter what product you are using- hopefully Proplant through). The reason behind this is that your soil will be still very wet and until it dries out it is a perfect environment for the disease. As well as try and reduce the moisture content in your turf to help get the turf to recover. This is the most essential in managing root rot pythium from what I’ve seen over the years with attending various seminars and talking to various turf pathologists and professors.

Apply your fungicide down past the crown do not leave on the surface with application (water in slightly after your boom application)

If you do have an outbreak with any disease, not just Pythium reduce the use of PGR’s until you get recovery. Also look at at tank mixing your fungicide as other diseases maybe present. An Ippon & Proplant tank mix is very effective here.

Cultural Controls of Pythium:

  • Avoid too much N
  • Aerate the area slightly to allow more oxygen to penetrate the soil
  • Utilise pentrant wetting agents to push the moisture through the profile
  • Keep plants healthy as possible with using root stimulants and other biological products
  • Avoid mowing in moist hot weather
  • Raise mowing heights
  • Avoid verti cutting, top dressing if greens are infected  as it puts more stress on the plant
  • Reduce leaf wetness
  • Increase air flow and sunlight to Pythium prone areas

I hope this short posts helps understand the disease a little better and how to manage it.

Any help needed again please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Thank Nadeem

As I sign off another storm is coming past our office at Wetherill Park

High to Extreme Disease Alert Sydney – December 2014

Wow after the driest spring on record and a very dry and hot November December has had a u-turn. high temps high rainfall. This is what I saw yesterday on the radar and on the road. Yes it did get worse after I got home (pic taken by passenger). The red on the radar meant very heavy rain.

 

Radar 3/12 Can't see a thing

 

UPDATED MY CLIMATE DISEASE PREDICTIVE MODEL APP (from livingturf.com.au) SHOWING EXTREME DISEASE ALERT FOR PYTHIUM IN SYDNEY

Photo 5-12-2014 11 05 51 Photo 5-12-2014 11 05 54

As you can see tfrom Monday 1st pythium pressure increased dramatically and is still extreme to high. Recommendation is Proplant as Proplant works in all disease pressure conditions especially known and proven as a strong pythium fungicide

Overnight I was speaking to a few supers on twitter on how much rain they received. There was quite  a difference with western Sydney copping about 45mm of rain while the eastern suburbs only got around 8-18mm which is very surprising since they are the ones who always get a drenching.

What all this means is that disease pressure is very high to extreme (my climate app report) at the moment and will be staying high for the next few days at least. Having a preventative program is the best option however even the best prevention program needs a little fine tuning. Here at Campbell’s we have Proplant available for pythium and is on the of the best products on the market available due to its curative abilities and longest residual over nay other pythium product. Proplant has been a trusted fungicide by meany turf managers for over 10 years now. In our trial work we did with Proplant we compared it against a standard pythium fungicide and found that the standard gave only 7 days residual while Proplant even at both the low and high rates gave 28 days.

For more information see the brochure here Proplant Brochure

Also have a look at our guide to managing pythium not just from a chemical point of view but from a cultural view. Disease guide rhizo eri pythium 2014

Managing pythium is not just use fungicide but use every tool you have at your disposal and make observations on your turf. You need to take a holistic approach from mowing practices, watering practices and inputs you are using. See our guide to find out more.

Proplant image

As always we do recommend a broad spectrum tank mix partner with Proplant (as its is specific to pythium only) as when we were anyalysing the samples in the trials we always found other diseases namely brown patch. So the options we have are:
So have a look at partnering Proplant with Ippon, 250GT, Protak, Monstar,

Again please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions.

 

Nadeem

zreikat@campbellchemcials.com.au

 

 

 

 

 

Summer is upon us – November 2014

Well as alot of you do as I do we constantly look at the weather to see what possible turf growing conditions we are facing. At the moment we are looking for some rain (well majority of us are but  the golf tournaments are starting and the less variables the better).

I did a post on preparing for the heat last season and i thought it may be a good one to revisit just as a refresher with a few updates. If you at the past post the weather maps are quite similar for the long term forecast. (see 2013 post here).

 

  • Start with a strong foundation early.Don’t skimp.
  • Review what you did last year and change what did not work.
  • Increase root health -Use root stimulants such as kelp, amino, humic fulvic acid products
  • Look at your irrigation practices- This will be harder as the summer goes on especially when your cool season grasses are stressing out with a shorter root system. Keep the soil moisture consistent as not to stress our turf. There is no right or wrong method here but the aim is to get desired turf conditions (as Dr. Micah Woods says). (This is where soil mositure metres come in very handy- more on that in a future post). For an expalnation on water irrigation management have a look at the picture below from Micah Woods at the Asian Turfgrass Centre For more information on this work below see this link to his blog post.

 

 

 

 

  • With warm season grasses protect your turf early on as the root system is still not fully active.
  • Do a preventative fungicide and insecticide program. (if anyone would like a program designed for them please contact me). Under stress conditions some systemic fungicides may take longer to be taken up as the plant will not be fully functioning properly so be wary of this and apply fungicides on a prevention basis.
  • Have a wetting agent program and start earlier rather than later
  • When hand watering use wetting agent tablets to help cure and prevent localised dry spots
  • Increase your height of cut. This will go a long way to help manager all types of stress with minimum disruption to greens speeds.
  • Communicate with your stakeholders the stresses the turf is going under to give them an understanding of the situation and to better support you in the long run.

 

I have a few product profiles coming as well but in the meantime I have been getting asked why Dacogreen WeatherShield is different to other chlorothalonil products. It lies in the active ingredient and the formulation. Dacogreen remember used be Daconil until about 10 years ago, we just had a name change.

See my post from last year here

 

Cheers

Nadeem

 

Pythium December 2012

 

 Pythium can be very destructive as seen on these bent grass golf greens

 

This is ashort post that you may hva eseen published on www.turfmate.com.au wesite as well.

 

Pythium is one of the most destrcuctive diseases of turf.  There are mnay species of pythium but the ones commonly found in Australia are pythium blight and

 

All turf species are affected but predominately fine cut turf of bent and couch grass. Pythium appears as circular spots during warm to hot humid weather. Spots appear as brown to bronze in colour. Pythium causes a wide range of damage including root and leaf blight. Outbreaks are most severe following warm nights coupled with humid days. Pythium is also very active during the seeding process as frequent watering is taking place, creating a humid and wet environment. Pythium can spread a number of ways including:

  • mowers
  • traffic
  • water- especially if water is from a dam or effluent as spores can be present.
  • poor drainage
  • low soil pH is ideal environment for Pythium along with high pH can lead to other disease issues
  • high soil nitrogen levels.


Pythium is always living in the soil and needs the right conditions to cause problems. Water logged greens are a perfect environment for Pythium. You can see Pythium as patterns in greens that follow the drainage lines. Equipment use also spreads the disease.

If you have a short root system with compacted soil and poor drainage, your turf will need extra light watering to keep it alive. This will increase Pythium pressure, due to plant wetness. On the other hand, deep infrequent watering can increase Pythium pressure as well as the roots and the soil are being completely soaked which is conducive to Pythium outbreaks. Very hard to win in this situation. That is why it is important to maintain healthy turf and to use specific Pythium fungicides on a preventative basis.

If you do have an outbreak with any disease, not just Pythium reduce the use of PGR’s until you get recovery. Also look at at tank mixing your fungicide as other diseases maybe present. An Ippon & Proplant tank mix is very effective here.

A hot summer can lead to an increase in Pythium as well – from over watering and a constant need to water

Cultural Controls of Pythium:

  • Avoid too much N
  • Keep plants healthy as possible with using root stimulants.
  • Avoid mowing in moist hot weather
  • Raise mowing heights
  • Avoid verti cutting, top dressing if greens are infected  as it puts more stress on the plant
  • Reduce leaf wetness
  • Increase air flow and sunlight to Pythium prone areas

  

Our Chemical control Solution

  • Proplant 45mL-65mL per 100m2 – apply with suficient water for good coverage. Water in 2-5mm. Proplant is a systemic fungicide that mnoves in an upwards direction and has both prevtantive and curative properties.